Reviews

Reviews

Bottom line, a $200 GeForce GTX 560 is a solid buy and a compelling alternative to the Radeon HD 6870. The worst thing you can say about either card is that they’re almost uncomfortably close to the superior Radeon HD 6950 and GeForce GTX 560 Ti. Then again, if you don't have the extra cash for those higher-end boards, that fact matters little. The $200 price point still offers more today than it ever has before.
This is a kick-ass product.
Based on our tests, it's pretty clear that the GTX 560 has a raw performance edge over the competition from AMD overall. However, that performance advantage isn't huge, and the Asus Radeon HD 6870 TOP has the distinction of being uncannily quiet for a $200 graphics card. Oh, sure, it draws a little more power at idle, but that doesn't seem to affect noise levels. In the other corner, the GeForce GTX 560 TOP is faster, nearly as quiet, and costs only $20 more. It has company, too. MSI's GeForce GTX 560 Frozr II is almost as quick, only a little bit louder, and $10 cheaper. While neither card has hexa-display support, both let you enjoy Nvidia-specific perks like PhysX and GeForce 3D Vision. Some users like those extras, while others couldn't care less. You can make up your own mind on that front.
We loved the GTX 560 Ti, and we love the new GTX 560 even more. With a strong factory overclock, this ASUS TOP version performs essentially the same as its sibling while costing considerably less. Toss in the beefy heatsink, lower temperatures, distinctive aesthetics, and great overclocking headroom, and this card simply owns the mid-range gaming card segment.
In terms of performance, we saw the MSI GTX 560 Twin Frozr II easily beat the Radeon 6870 in just about every facet. Perhaps more significant is the fact that it's only 6% behind the GTX 560 Ti on average, but costs almost 20% less. That is an outstanding value, as Nvidia is now providing what may be a better graphics card for the mid-range market and gamers on a more modest budget. The $200 market is the sweet spot for manufacturers, and the GTX 560 now owns it.
After reading these pages on the Gigabyte GTX 560 some AMD fanboys may have a change in thought. The Gigabyte GTX 560 is one if not the best performing video card in the $175-$200 price range. Easy outperforming the likes of the Radeon HD 6850 or other offerings the GTX 560 cannot be denied its place in the rankings.
Overall the GTX 560 is a good graphics card that fills in the gaps for Nvidia, and performs right where it should considering its $200 MSRP. Additionally, this card offers all the latest high-end feature available to the Fermi architecture such as 3D Vision support, CUDA processing and PhysX.
Performance was great and everything worked perfectly so if the price is right this card makes a great choice!
The Palit GTX 560 card is a clear improvement over the 1GB GTX 460. It’s likely the 2GB frame buffer only had a minor impact; most of the improvements are due to the GTX 560’s higher clock speeds and streamlining of the internal circuitry since the FTX 460. Palit’s suggesting a $199 retail price for the card. Most GTX 560 cards will likely ship with 1GB of GDDR5, but will be factory overclocked. With the Palit 2GB card, you’re trading off core clock speeds for additional frame buffer. Even without overclocking, though, Palit’s GTX 560 2GB card acquits itself quite well indeed.
The Legit Bottom Line: With an alright price and performance that is on par with higher end AMD cards the EVGA GeForce GTX 560 SC is a great upgrade for an aging 9800 GT or older card. For around two hundred dollars you can enter the DX11 arena and play newer game at higher resolutions.
The new GeForce GTX 560 performs right about where its model number suggests. The Asus GTX 560 DirectCU II TOP and MSI N560GTX Twin Frozr II performed a fair bit better than the GeForce GTX 460 1GB and just a step behind the more powerful GeForce GTX 560 Ti. In general, the Asus and MSI GeForce GTX 560 cards also performed better than their direct competition from Team AMD, the Radeon HD 6850 and 6870. There were a couple of instances where the 6870 came out on top (F1 2010, Metro 2033), but the GeForce came out ahead in the rest of our benchmarks. If you’ve got about $210 to spend on a graphics card, the new GeForce GTX 560 is an attractive option.
Overall however, the ASUS GTX 560 DirectCU II TOP video is a solid piece of hardware, not just because of the metal shroud but also figuratively speaking as it stands tall even and can go toe-to-toe with the more expensive GTX560 Ti and HD6870. Despite the performance of the SmartDoctor software, people will buy this card for the hardware and not the bundled software so it doesn’t really matter to the end user, especially since they can just use a different program to tweak their GTX 560 DirectCU II TOP video card. In terms of value, the ASUS GTX 560 DirectCU II TOP video card carries a $20 premium over the reference GTX 560 although considering you are getting the performance equivalent of a GTX 560 Ti which currently costs $240 while also getting a better and quieter cooling solution, you can look at it as $20 saved.
NVIDIA seems to have hit all the high points by improving upon the GTX 460 in every way possible. Anyone doubting the GPU market’s price / performance ratio isn’t moving forward fast enough need not look any further than the GTX 560. In barely 10 months we have seen the GTX 460 1GB -which launched at $230- surpassed by the $199 GTX 560. The difference isn’t insignificant either; the new GF114-based card offers a nearly 20% improvement in framerates over the previous generation without a noticeable increase in power consumption